Roasting, because it’s the only thing that brings me peace.

And a lack of excruciating physical pain.

But mostly the peace, and not editing another 3 hours of audio instruction for a language I don’t understand.

jasonbaldwin
jasonbaldwin:


  My great-grandfather, Lawrence B. Welmer, behind the bar of at Welmer Brothers Tavern, which he owned with his brother, Frank.


Thinking about Pop today, a couple of months before what would have been his 118th birthday.

I was listening to Alton Brown’s podcast a week or two ago, when he had Brooks Reitz of Jack Rudy Cocktail Co. on, and was inspired.

I’ve been hearing stories about my great-grandfather for almost 39 years. He’s a wonderful, magical myth: a Navy man who served as a radio operator on the U.S.S. Leviathan in World War I, a devoted husband, father, business owner, and community leader. Above all else, he loved his family, as do I.

I never had the chance to meet him, as he died 13 years before I was born, but I feel like I’ve known him my whole life. I think he’d be proud of what I’m trying to do, so to honor him, I’m naming the business after him. So, long story short, inspired by Mr. Reitz and thanks to Mr. Brown for the nudge, as of Monday, April 7, Baldwin’s Beans will become Pop’s Coffee Roasters.

I haven’t finished the logo or the website or any of that, but I have a domain, popscoffee.us, a Twitter handle, etc., and I want to be successful enough to bring my brother on board, just like Pop and his brother, with their tavern and tire & battery shop 75 years ago.

I just hope I can live to be half the man he was.

jasonbaldwin:

My great-grandfather, Lawrence B. Welmer, behind the bar of at Welmer Brothers Tavern, which he owned with his brother, Frank.

Thinking about Pop today, a couple of months before what would have been his 118th birthday.

I was listening to Alton Brown’s podcast a week or two ago, when he had Brooks Reitz of Jack Rudy Cocktail Co. on, and was inspired.

I’ve been hearing stories about my great-grandfather for almost 39 years. He’s a wonderful, magical myth: a Navy man who served as a radio operator on the U.S.S. Leviathan in World War I, a devoted husband, father, business owner, and community leader. Above all else, he loved his family, as do I.

I never had the chance to meet him, as he died 13 years before I was born, but I feel like I’ve known him my whole life. I think he’d be proud of what I’m trying to do, so to honor him, I’m naming the business after him. So, long story short, inspired by Mr. Reitz and thanks to Mr. Brown for the nudge, as of Monday, April 7, Baldwin’s Beans will become Pop’s Coffee Roasters.

I haven’t finished the logo or the website or any of that, but I have a domain, popscoffee.us, a Twitter handle, etc., and I want to be successful enough to bring my brother on board, just like Pop and his brother, with their tavern and tire & battery shop 75 years ago.

I just hope I can live to be half the man he was.

Why I Love David Letterman, Part The First

I have a lot of thoughts swirling around about Dave’s retirement that I’m trying to formulate into something cohesive. I’m an almost lifelong resident of Indiana, and his move to CBS the first week of my sophomore year of college was when I really started watching. Conan’s version of Late Night started two weeks later, and the two had a huge impact on my comedic sensibility.

I’ve loved every Christmas show with Darlene Love. I’ve loved every quizzical look he’s given after an inappropriate Paul Shaffer interruption. I’ve loved every segment with Rupert Jee at Hello Deli, every remote with Biff Henderson, every check-in with his mother, Dorothy, every Sirajul and Mujibur bit … all of it.

I may be in the minority, by nature of geography mostly, but what I’ve loved most about David Letterman is his unwavering devotion to and celebration of Indiana, because he’s consistently shown, year after year, that a kid who grew up here can make it. We Hoosiers often get short shrift, especially in popular culture, as a state full of backward hicks or lumped in with the other “flyover” states. Above all else, David Letterman has been, for almost my entire life, an example that anything is possible, in a place where it can often seem that one’s life will be defined by their geography and circumstance.

My list of heroes is pretty short, but if I ever had a personal Mount Rushmore, Letterman would be on it.

I have more to say, but this is enough for now.